Apr 132010
 

I was in your March [2008] Steel TIG class.

I built my frame to be a time trial or pursuit track bike. I copied a lot of the geometry from a 56cm EAI Bare Knuckle that fits me well. However, I made some adjustments to move the bottom bracket back by about 35mm and up about 30mm. This is a bit counter-intuitive for some, especially those who believe your knee should never be over your toe during your pedal stroke… But, I claim that it depends on when and where you apply your power. This adjusted bottom bracket helps me open up my body to leg angle which I hope gives me a bit more muscle efficiency. Of course, I’ll have to prove this on the track…

Although the first home for this bike is the track, I wanted the option to use it in any sort of fixed gear road event. The increased bottom bracket height from the ground allows me to run slightly bigger cranks (72.5) and still be a bit aggressive on flat corners.. Some worry that this increase in height may be unstable or un-aerodynamic… we’ll see, hopefully these guys will be behind me at the end of the day…

I did discover by accident (not by design) that my special geometry will allow for full bar spins… nice… bonus…

Top Tube: 25.4mm Columbus 8-5-8
Seat Tube/ Down Tube: 28.6mm Columbus 8-5-5
Chain Stay: Kaisei
Seat Stay: Columbus
Surly Track Hooded Rear dropouts

Frame weight: 3.5lbs (un-painted)
Built Bike weight: 15.5lbs

Fork+Stem: Oval Track
Bars: Nitto
Headset: Chris King (of course)
Crank: Sugino 75 (72.5mm crank-arms)

Wheels:
Reynolds Track w/ Phil Wood Hubs for training (tubular)
CaneCreek Sprint 85 for race (tubular)

Paint: Rattle-Can Auto Metallic Black paint, primer, and clear-coat
+ Silver Sheet sticker stock from local hobby shop

 Posted by at 3:17 pm
Apr 132010
 

Greetings from Boise. Attached please find photos of the Chris’ Cross made at the TIG Steel class last Sept./Oct [2007]. I picked up my welder yesterday and am super excited. Miller Dynasty 200 DX…Suh-weet!

 Posted by at 2:55 pm
Apr 132010
 

00157

“I just build my bike up today took it out for a little ride to take care of some minor tuning issues and she’s ready to race, tomorrow actually. So far so good, pretty quick at turning and sooo much stiffer than my ’83 trek 500. I’m pretty happy with the finished product and meeting you all and coming back here and meeting all the local frame builders has been great…Can’t wait to come back and weld myself a Ti bike!”

 Posted by at 2:52 pm
Apr 132010
 

Here is my frame that I built in class (June 2007) and it turned out great. It handles the long descents here in the Rockies with confidence. Stable as a rock at 50 plus mph. I am setting up shop here and hope to be up and running by the first of the year. Look for “Victoria Cycles” some time after that, when I have enough product to have my web site running. Thanks again for all your help there at UBI, you have helped me to make my dream a reality.

 Posted by at 2:45 pm
Apr 132010
 

My first frame is now attached to enough components so it can be considered a complete bike. I had the intention of it being a new school dirt jumper and it feels like it in some ways, but it also rides a little like an old school BMX cruiser. Like an old GT 24″ I have, sort of. It rides great and straight even with no hands! It jumps good, manuals good (a ton easier than the GT), feels pretty stiff and corners like it’s on rails. The finish on it right now is a rattle can clear coat and I like the way it looks but it is soft. I’m going to find a paint shop that can give it a durable clear coat, hopefully for a cheap price.

 Posted by at 2:38 pm
Apr 132010
 

This is a 650c-wheeled track bike for racing on the San Diego velodrome. I built it to replace my 49 cm Bianchi Pista, which is a great first track bike, but was always a little too big for me. My design goals were to raise the bars to a more comfortable position while maintaining sufficient standover clearance, and to eliminate toe overlap.

I spent a lot of time on the finish work (which is still not quite done). I will be sending it out for paint soon, but I wanted to give it a test-ride before the end of the track season, so I laced up the wheels and built it up. There’s not much to it – Nitto bars, NOS Shimano hidden-clamp stem, Harris track hubs, Velocity rims, and Sugino 75 cranks. It turned out to be very sensitive to chain line due to the smaller distance between the bottom bracket and rear hub.

My first ride was absolutely fantastic. It rides like it was built for me – imagine that! At 60 mm trail, it holds a perfect line without being at all sluggish to steer. I’d describe the ride quality as spirited – I feel every bump and variation in traction, but without any harshness. The 650c wheels spin up faster, and I find myself racing harder because the bike is so responsive – it will go as fast as I want to go, and then some! My only complaint is that I should have left the chainstays a bit longer. My tires are a bit taller than their nominal 23mm width, so if I leave enough chain to remove the rear wheel without deflating the tire, the axle is all the way at the ends of the dropouts. If I switch to 19mm tires and take out a link, it’ll be perfect.

The bike got a lot of attention at its track debut. I kept finding myself telling people how satisfying it is to design and build your own frame. This one isn’t even done yet, and I’m already thinking about my next one, or two, or…

Thank you for a wonderful class!

 Posted by at 2:17 pm
Apr 132010
 

Here is my bike that I built at UBI. It’s fillet brazed steel (Columbus and Reynolds from what I remember). I built it to be more of an All Mountain Singlespeed. With the Rockshox Revelation, it has a 13.75″ BB, 68.5 degree HA and 22.75″ TT. The frame weight before paint was 4lbs 1 oz. The powdercoat added 3 oz and was done by a local powdercoater using whatever was in the can at the same time (they were painting white fences so I went with the white). Total bike weight as pictured is 23.5lbs. With lighter components (smaller tires, Spinner Aeris fork), it weighs 21 lbs.

 Posted by at 2:09 pm
Apr 132010
 

This is bike number one of 14 now. I chose fairly standard track geometry: 74 degree head and seat tube, 60mm of BB drop, shortest chainstays possible, and a 56cm square frame. Despite some not-so-pretty welds, I’ve been pounding this bike through the streets of Minneapolis for five years with no problems. With a Dura Ace track group it weighs 15.5 lbs. The bars are wrapped with twine and coated with polyurethane. The crank is actually a standard road model with the inner chainring tabs filed off, the headset is filed out, too, to make it threadless. Please check out the bikes I later built on my own at www.clockworkbikes.com I can’t say enough good things about UBI, it was absolutely instrumental in my start to frame building–I even went twice! Thanks, Joel

 Posted by at 1:54 pm